Houston Low Floor Bus Accident Lawyer

Houston Low Floor Bus Accident Lawyer

low-floor bus is a bus or trolleybus that has no steps between the ground and the floor of the bus at one or more entrances, and low floor for part or all of the passenger cabin. A bus with a partial low floor may also be referred to as a low-entry bus in some locations.

Low floor refers to a bus deck that is accessible from the sidewalk with only a single step with a small height difference, caused solely by the difference between the bus deck and sidewalk. This is distinct from high-floor, a bus deck design that requires climbing one or more steps (now known as step entrance) to access the interior floor that is placed at a higher height. Being low-floor improves the accessibility of the bus for the public, particularly the elderly and people with disabilities, including those using wheelchairs and walkers. Almost all are rear-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout with no drive shaft.

In the United States, the Americans with Disabilities Act is credited with motivating the development of low-floor buses.[9] The first low-floor (low-entry) buses to be delivered were the New Flyer Low Floor D40LF, to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in 1991. The New Flyer LF was derived from the Den Oudsten B85/B86 [nl]. Other competitors followed suit, with the Orion VI (1995), Nova Bus LF Series (1996, also derived from the Den Oudsten B85), Gillig Low Floor (1997, derived from a shuttle bus design for the Hertz rental car agency), and Neoplan AN440L (1990/94/99). By 2008, most new bus orders in the United States were for low-floor buses.[10]

Low-floor buses usually include an area without seating (or seating that folds up) next to at least one of the doors, where wheelchairswalkers, strollers/prams, and where allowed even bicycles, can be parked. This is sometimes not the only purpose of this area, though, as many operators employ larger standee areas for high occupancy at peak times. Despite the space existing, operators may also insist that only one or two wheelchairs or pushchairs can be accommodated unfolded, due to space/safety concerns.

Low floors can be complemented by a hydraulic or pneumatic ‘kneeling device’, which can be used when the bus is not in motion, tilting it or lowering it at the front axle even further, often down to normal curb height. Depending on how close to the curb the bus is parked and wheelchair design, this can allow wheelchair users to board unaided. Though such technology has been available and in use on high-floor buses since the 1970s, it is of significant utility on low-floor vehicles only where it enables less-mobile passengers to board and leave the vehicle without help from others. Many vehicles are also equipped with wheel-chair lifts, or ramps which, when combined with a low floor, can provide a nearly level entry.

Houston Low Floor Bus Accident Lawyer

It is advisable to consult an experienced cause of accident Houston truck accident attorney Reshard Alexander who will help determine liability and the right compensation amount that you should get for your injuries. The insurance company of the at-fault driver may not be willing to pay for damages and we can help you with the negotiation process. Call us today at (713) 766-3322 for a free consultation.

Private Carrier Texas Bus Lines
Greyhound Lines
Grupo Senda
Jefferson Lines
Megabus (subsidiary of Stagecoach Group)
METRO Bus
Shofur
Stagecoach Group
Thruway Motorcoach (Amtrak)
Vonlane

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