Most Dangerous Roads In Houston For Drivers

Most Dangerous Roads In Houston For Drivers

Houston’s freeway system includes 575.5 miles of freeways and expressways in the 10-county metro area.[1] The State of Texas plans to spend $5.06 billion on Houston area highways between 2002 and 2007. Houston freeways are heavily traveled and often under construction to meet the demands of continuing growth. Interstate 45 south has been in a continuous state of construction, in one portion or another, almost since the first segment, the Gulf Freeway—Texas’s first freeway—was opened in 1948. Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) planners have sought ways to reduce rush hour congestion, primarily through High-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes for vans and carpools. Timed freeway entrances, which regulate the addition of cars to the freeway, are also common. Houston has an extensive network of freeway cameras linked to a traffic management center,[2] to monitor and study traffic. One characteristic of Houston’s freeways (and Texas freeways in general) are its frontage roads (which locals call “feeders”). Alongside most freeways are two to four lanes in each direction parallel to the freeway permitting easy access to individual city streets. Frontage roads provide access to the freeway from businesses alongside, such as gas stations and retail stores. New landscaping projects and a longstanding ban on new billboards are ways Houston has tried to control the potential side effects of convenience.

Houston has a hub-and-spoke freeway structure with multiple loops. The innermost is Interstate 610, forming approximately a 10-mile-diameter (16 km) loop around downtown. The roughly square “Loop-610” is quartered into “North Loop,” “South Loop,” “West Loop,” and “East Loop.” The roads of Beltway 8 and their freeway core, the Sam Houston Tollway, are the next loop, at a diameter of roughly 25 miles. A proposed highway project, State Highway 99 (The Grand Parkway), would form a third loop outside Houston, though some sections of this project have been controversial. As of June 2016, two portions of State Highway 99 have been completed: a 14.5-mile segment completed in April 2008 that runs from Interstate 10 in Mont Belvieu to Business State Highway 146 in Baytown, east of Houston; and a 71-mile segment completed between August 1994 and March 2016 that runs from Interstate 69/U.S. Highway 59 in Sugar Land, southwest of Houston, to Interstate 69/U.S. Highway 59 in New Caney, northeast of Houston. The next portions to be constructed are from the current terminus at Interstate 69/U.S. Highway 59 in Sugar Land to State Highway 288 in Brazoria County, and from the current terminus at Interstate 69/U.S. Highway 59 in New Caney to the current terminus at Interstate 10 in Mont Belvieu.

Houston also lies along the route of the proposed Interstate 69 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) superhighway that will link Canada, the U.S. industrial mid-west, Texas, and Mexico.

Most Dangerous Roads in Houston

It is advisable to consult an experienced cause of accident Houston truck accident attorney Reshard Alexander who will help determine liability and the right compensation amount that you should get for your injuries. The insurance company of the at-fault driver may not be willing to pay for damages and we can help you with the negotiation process. Call us today at (713) 766-3322 for a free consultation.

Most Dangerous Roads in Houston Links
610 Loop
Crosby Freeway US 90
Decker Drive Spur 330
Deke Slayton Blvd FM 518
Eastex Freeway US 59
Farm To Market Road 2920
Fort Bend Westpark Tollway
Grand Parkway State Highway 99
Hardy Toll Road
Katy Baytown Freeway Interstate 10
Lowry Expressway Farm To Market Road 1764
North Freeway Interstate 45
Northwest Freeway 290
Old Galveston State Highway 6
Sam Houston Tollway Beltway 8
Southwest Freeway Interstate 69
Tomball Parkway State Highway 249
Spur 527
Spur 5 Texas State Highway 35
La Porte Freeway State Highway 225
Texas State Highway 146
John F Kennedy Blvd
NASA Parkway